Travel Memories: Buffalo Curd and Palm Treacle in Sri Lanka

One of my favourite experiences in my trip to Sri Lanka was having breakfast.  Each morning, sitting overlooking beautiful Unawtuna beach at the the wonderful Kingfisher Hotel, I had my morning coffee, fresh tropical fruit salad and a bowl of buffalo curd and palm treacle.

Buffalo curd is thick and smooth.  Like real Greek yoghurt that you get in Greece, the curd  is mellow, creamy and just simply divine. There is no sourness like the yoghurt we get in Australia.

Sri Lankan treacle from the toddy palm is not sickly sweet, very similar to pure Canadian maple syrup.   It is a pure product is also used to make a hardened version called jaggery, which is similar to palm sugar.

I loved this liquid treacle very much and decided that I must bring some home with me – alas…unfortunately, dear reader, I must report that of the two bottles I purchased, only one made it home.

The other was smashed on my flight between Sri Lanka and Kuala Lumpur.  My suitcase was also broken, so not quite sure what happened in transit, but I opened my bag to smashed glass and palm treacle through every item of my luggage !    Fortunately, I was able to get to a laundromat whilst everything was still wet from the treacle. It completely washed out of everything 🙂

Buffalo curd is sold in these very unique terracotta dishes.  The dishes can be recycled and used (along with a terracotta lid) as a traditional clay cooking pot.

I read online, that the best buffalo curd is traditionally made by firstly rinsing the clay pot with buffalo urine, which sours the buffalo milk (just as the souring agent does with yoghurt) and causes the creation of the milk to curd.

Yikes, that almost turned me off trying it.  Luckily I decided to put aside my fears as I would have missed out on one of the culinary highlights of my trip.  Buffalo milk has a higher fat content than cows milk, which is probably why it is so heavenly – for the same reason that buffalo mozzarella is seen as superior over the cows milk variety.

Just one of the many culinary delights I experienced from the island that was previously known, quite rightly, as Serendip (Serendipity).  Stay tuned for more!

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About Soul Kitchen Blog

Welcome to Soul Kitchen Blog. Sure food ultimately is fuel for the body but made with love is so much more and truly nourishes the soul. As cliche as it sounds, life really is too short to eat bad food and drink bad wine. I have a passion for cooking and a love of good food. I am committed to my quest of searching for fabulous recipes that just so happen to be gluten free. In recent years I discovered that I have intolerance to gluten and whilst its changed my eating habits somewhat, I refuse to allow it to limit my choices to eat well or make those that I cook for feel that they are missing out on anything. My mandate is simple... Feed the body and nourish the soul. I look forward to sharing my journey with you ....
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6 Responses to Travel Memories: Buffalo Curd and Palm Treacle in Sri Lanka

  1. AKGDDM says:

    I am not sure, how is the condition and hygenic level. Having breakfast by the beach would be very refreshing.
    Halthy cooking tips and nutritional meal recipes click to http://www.akgventures.com/blog

  2. lovely article about a Sri Lankan delight that I too am a great fan of! Hope you will visit again one day 🙂

  3. Maggie bennett says:

    Just back from latest trip to beautiful Sri Lanka. Love curd and treacle, managed to get a bottle of pure Kithul syrup home in one piece!

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